pQRP ... Pacific Northwest QRP Interest Group

pQRP is a yahoogroup I started several years ago to be a place where Pacific Northwest QRP enthusiasts could chat. It has come in and out of popularity over time, sometimes used and sometimes not. I like it because it allows anyone to join and have contact with everyone completely through email. There is no need to join yahoogroups (except for me as administrator) and everyone can share information freely. Anything sent to the group is automatically distributed to all members. For people who would like to get a digest (one email a day) or read the emails online, these options are available as well.

To contact the group by email, you can use the following addresses:

Subscribe: pQRP-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: pQRP-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

Joining instructions are at the bottom of this page.

Low Power with the FT817

One of my favorite activities is operating my small FT817 portable. I like to go places, throw up a temporary antenna, and get on the air. I've got my gear in a Communication Outfitters pack including my MP-1 and my ATX Walkabout antennas and the Z-11 tuner. I can setup on a picnic table and be operating inside of 5 minutes on nearly any band. It's GREAT. Here's a picture which shows how I'm setup ... this isn't my pack, but it's nearly like it. I'll take some pictures of my own setup and post them here.


Low Power with the SG2020

My latest addition to my ham shack is the SG2020 ADSP2 which I am growing to love as a remarkably easy to use and robust unit for travelling. The SGC 2020 is a wonderful QRP rig with enough extra power (up to 20 watts) that I can add a little more when I need to make the contact. I'm working with it every day trying to learn how best to operate it.

Most of my operation is done portable. I usually work out of my Ford Expedition as an operating station, sometimes walking (when I can walk, right now I can't) or sometimes just using a convenient table. I've got my 2020 setup in a Communications Outfitters Expedition Trail Pack.

This is my trail pack all setup for the field

This is what the radio setup looks like inside. Inside there is an SG-2020 Transceiver, an SG-211 Tuner, a 7Ah Gel Cell, and an 8 foot helically wound whip which comes out the top of the pack when operating.

In 2004, I wore this pack at Dayton each day, walking around the floor and sometimes operating HF in action. It made for lots of comments and lots of interest. It's definitely a workable setup and used only off-the-shelf equipment.

QRP Operation

QRP is about low power operation. Even though amateurs can use much higher powers, many find far more interest in making contact with the minimum power possible. QRP operation is defined differently by different people, but is generally agreed to be less than 5 watts of output power.  Operating at such low power requires skill, persistence, and knowledge to a much higher extent than otherwise. It is my favorite way to make contacts.

QRP ARCI (QRP Amateur Radio Club International) - The premier club for operators interested in QRP operation.

Antennas & Propagation

No one operates QRP for long without knowing that antennas and propagation are exceptionally important to you. I have a number of portable antennas that I love and also spend a lot of time working on wire antennas, sometimes tuned with a tuner, usually an SGC-237. Since I operate portable a lot, I focus on antennas I can carry in my car:

Buddipole - Budd Drummond invented this for people who want a light weight, very flexible system. I've used this as a vertical, dipole, J-Pole, and more. It's quite a nice little system and light enough that it can easily be carried for use in the field. If I'm going to have to hike any distance, this is the antenna I will bring along unless I just grab some wire and my slingshot.

Picture coming

RADS 9/11A - Robin Faulkner, N7GSU, designed this antenna for a combination of HF, VHF, and UHF operation. I've used this a lot on Search & Rescue missions where I needed to setup a relay or use both HF and VHF bands. This antenna is most suitable for use out of the car.

Picture coming

EZ Hang - When I need to string a wire up, I usually use the EZ Hang to get it up into a tree. Works well for me and is really quite simple after a little practice.

Picture coming

 

Our QRP Interest Group

We have a group that meets informally on an ad hoc basis to share information about our interests. We also have the pQRP group online available for sharing information with each other. This is a small group, not a club, but we have a lot of fun chatting about QRP. If you're interested in hearing about our group, I'll try to make sure that copies of our announcements are posted to pQRP.

Wayne NB6M

For those who do not know Wayne NB6M, he relocated here this summer from California where he was an avid QRPer. Alot of you are familiar with his work:
 

http://www.amqrp.org/kits/miniboots/miniboot.htm
 
http://www.norcalqrp.org/nb6msm40vxo.htm
 
http://www.radioactivehams.com/~n0rc/rm/mods/Rock-Mite_VXO/Rock_Mite_VXO_ModsII.html
 
http://www.kkn.net/archives/html/QRP-L/2000-07/msg01871.html
 
http://www.amqrp.org/projects/paddle/NB6M%20Paddles.html
 

Pie & Coffee Sessions

Our QRP interest group gets together regularly to talk about QRP, share stories and ideas, and generally share our common interest in QRP operation. These sessions are driven by Alan KB7MBI and every one of us who partipates is thankful for his tireless efforts to keep us going. Most recently, the meeting was held at the Crystal Creek Cafe:

Crystal Creek Cafe
(425) 486-7781
22620 Bothell Everett Hwy
Bothell, WA 98021
2.4 mi N- Directions

 

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Page Copyright 2005 by Terry R Dettmann, WX7S
Last updated 28 June 2007